Topic ideas for writing a sonnet lesson

These are all well and good, but easy to become redundant about.

Topic ideas for writing a sonnet lesson

Simile - contrasting to seemingly unalike things to enhance the meaning of a situation or theme using like or as What happens to a dream deferred, does it dry up like a raisin in the sun Hyperbole - exaggeration I have a million things to do today.

Personification - giving non-human objects human characteristics America has thrown her hat into the ring, and will be joining forces with the British. Foot - grouping of stressed and unstressed syllables used in line or poem Iamb - unstressed syllable followed by stressed Made famous by the Shakespearian sonnet, closest to the natural rhythm of human speech How do I love thee?

The iamb stumbles through my books; trochees rush and tumble; while anapest runs like a hurrying brook; dactyls are stately and classical. Remember, though the most immediate forms of imagery are visual, strong and effective imagery can be used to invoke an emotional, sensational taste, touch, smell etc or even physical response.

Suspense - The tension that the author uses to create a feeling of discomfort about the unknown Conflict - Struggle between opposing forces. Exposition - Background information regarding the setting, characters, plot.

Point of View - pertains to who tells the story and how it is told. The point of view of a story can sometimes indirectly establish the author's intentions. Narrator - The person telling the story who may or may not be a character in the story.

Second person - Narrator addresses the reader directly as though she is part of the story. Does not assume character's perspective and is not a character in the story. The narrator reports on events and lets the reader supply the meaning.

Omniscient - All-knowing narrator multiple perspectives. The narrator knows what each character is thinking and feeling, not just what they are doing throughout the story. This type of narrator usually jumps around within the text, following one character for a few pages or chapters, and then switching to another character for a few pages, chapters, etc.

Rhythm is the juxtaposition of stressed and unstressed beats in a poem, and is often used to give the reader a lens through which to move through the work. See meter and foot Setting - the place or location of the action. The setting provides the historical and cultural context for characters.

It often can symbolize the emotional state of characters.

Related Questions

Speaker - the person delivering the poem. Remember, a poem does not have to have a speaker, and the speaker and the poet are not necessarily one in the same. Structure fiction - The way that the writer arranges the plot of a story.

Repeated elements in action, gesture, dialogue, description, as well as shifts in direction, focus, time, place, etc. Structure poetry - The pattern of organization of a poem.

For example, a Shakespearean sonnet is a line poem written in iambic pentameter. Because the sonnet is strictly constrained, it is considered a closed or fixed form.

Symbolism - when an object is meant to be representative of something or an idea greater than the object itself. Cross - representative of Christ or Christianity Bald Eagle - America or Patriotism Owl - wisdom or knowledge Yellow - implies cowardice or rot Tone - the implied attitude towards the subject of the poem.

Is it hopeful, pessimistic, dreary, worried?Featured Quote They say, if money go before, all ways do lie open.

topic ideas for writing a sonnet lesson

The Merry Wives of Windsor, (), Ford Shakespeare acquired substantial wealth thanks to his acting and writing abilities, and his shares in London theatres. 58 Assignment #3: Thesis Writing Exercise After reviewing Gordon Harvey’s criteria for a strong thesis statement in class, ask students to compose two thesis statements that adhere to Harvey’s criteria, meaning that they.

Sonnets: Lesson plans for writing and reading them Exploring the Sonnet In this technology-integrated lesson, students explore Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 and an Italian sonnet, then write one of their own.

This lesson includes a rubric. Hate to Love Sonnets In Shakespeare s "Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer s Day," the writer has perfected . (used relatively in restrictive clauses having that as the antecedent): Damaged goods constituted part of that which was sold at the auction.

(used after a preposition to represent a specified antecedent): the horse on which I rode. (used relatively to represent a specified or implied antecedent) the one that; a particular one that: You may choose which you like.

Instructor: Heather Jenkins Heather has a bachelor's degree in elementary education and a master's degree in special education. She was a public school teacher and administrator for 11 years.

The permutations of love as a sonnet topic are endless -- romantic love, unrequited love, discovery of new love, loss of old love, familial love, love and death, love and God, love and ice cream. To write a love sonnet, think about what inspires the most joy or pain, and you'll discover a wealth of things to say.

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